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Overview

Many employers think their OSHA recordkeeping logs and procedures are fully compliant, only to learn after an OSHA inspection and, in some cases, hundreds of thousands of dollars in penalties, that they were not. Under OSHA's recordkeeping regulation, covered employers are required to prepare and maintain logs for work-related occupational injuries and illnesses as well fatalities, using the OSHA 300 log. In addition, on February 1 of each year, all covered employers must post their 300A summaries for three (3) months.

Why you should Attend

During the Obama Administration, OSHA made numerous changes to its occupational injury and illness recordkeeping and reporting requirements. These changes to its recordkeeping standard dramatically increased employers' reporting requirements.

Areas Covered in the Session

  • Examine the many recordkeeping pitfalls that employers face, especially those with multiple locations and those using temporary employees;
  • Cover how to coordinate your injury and illness recordkeeping with other recordkeeping requirements and how employers can effectively use recordkeeping to improve their current safety and health management program; and
  • Examine in detail the changes made by the final rule and, in particular, the increased employer reporting requirements for all employers.

Who Will Benefit

  • Safety directors
  • Safety professionals
  • HR directors and managers
  • Production managers
  • Supervisors
  • Workers comp managers
  • Safety committee members
  • Maintenance department managers

Speaker Profile

Edwin G. Foulke, Jr. is a partner in the Atlanta office of Fisher & Phillips LLP. Ed also serves as President of Fisher Phillips Safety Solutions LLC. Prior to joining Fisher & Phillips, Ed was the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health. Named by President George W. Bush to head OSHA, Ed served in that capacity from April 2006 to November 2008.

During his tenure at OSHA, workplace injury, illness, and fatality rates dropped to their lowest levels in recorded history. For more than 30 years, Ed has worked in the labor and employment area, focusing on occupational safety and health issues. He also served on the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission in Washington, DC, chairing the Commission from March 1990 to February 1994.

Ed has been named one of the "50 Most Influential EHS Leaders" by EHS Today magazine for several years and named one of the "50 Most Influential EHS Leaders" in the United States by Occupational Hazards magazine. He is recognized as one of the nation’s leading authorities on occupational safety and health issues.